Algonquin Township

Algonquin Township Road District – Anna May Miller – time for no time recorded..and then some

McHenry Co. (ECWd) –

Recent exposure of Anna May Miller’s political work from public computers and the fuzzy math time cards has raised more questions than we can keep up with.  Miller was also a County Board member while being employed by her husband at the Algonquin Township Road District.  As we cross-referenced Road District records with County records we get a better idea how things were done under the Miller operation.

April 9, 2015, Anna May has a committee of the whole meeting at the County at 8 am.  She claimed 34 miles in travel reimbursement according to the county record and was shown as present in the minutes from the meeting.

April 9th, 2015 she was also in attendance for the County Board meeting that began at 9 am and ended at 12:25 pm according to the minutes from that meeting.

The time card for her Road District employment on that same day is most interesting.  April 9th, 2015 reflects 8 hours of regular time and an additional 3 hours of overtime.  Considering the courthouse is about 30 minutes from the Road District, the soonest she would be back to work would be approximately 1 pm.  Assuming she worked another 11 hours as claimed, she would have left the Road District office around midnight.  It’s possible.

Why the reference to “approximately” 1 pm and “about” midnight?

Turns out the time card for that particular day has no start and stop time listed.  Instead, it just shows 8 hours worked and 3 hours overtime with absolutely no record of when such work started or stopped.  Time for no time!

How do 7 hours and 10 minutes of clock in and out time end up getting 6 hours of reg time, 2 hours of vacation time, and 1.75 hours of overtime on the 6th?  This entry appears to confirm it takes 30 minutes to get from the County complex to the Road District considering the L&J meeting adjourned at 10 am according to county records and she clocked in at the Road District at 10:30.

April 7th reflects clocking in at 7:40, an hour for lunch, and clocking out at 10:20.  That totals 13 hrs and 40 minutes, yet the record shows a total of 14 hours, 20 minutes more overtime than actually worked.

April 8th, clocks in at 1 pm, we assume because she is at a meeting at the county that day until 11:35.  What time did she clock out from the Road District?  It reflects 4 hours of vacation and 4 hours of regular time, even though there is no clock out time recorded.

Two more fuzzy math days are the 10th and 12th of April, 2015.  On the 10th she works 8 hours and twenty minutes yet it’s recorded as 8 hours regular time and .8 hours (48 minutes) of overtime. By recording it as it is, an extra 28 minutes of overtime is paid for that day.

On the 12th of April, no clock in or out time is recorded yet she records 30 minutes of overtime.

It appears this time card reflects 3.08 hours of overtime created from fuzzy math and no less than 50 minutes of regular time that was not worked.

  • .83 hours for the 6th – regular time
  • 1.75 hours for the 6th -overtime
  • .33 hours for the 7th -overtime
  • .47 hours for the 10th -overtime
  • .5 hours for the 12th -overtime

With .83 hours of regular time at $30.0 an hour and 3.05 hours @ $45.00 an hour for overtime, it appears fuzzy math bumped the payroll $162.15 for this one time card.  Add this to the first time card math exposed in this article and we see that an extra $278.10 from two time cards was generated.

We are holding approximately 179 time cards that are being reviewed and the fuzzy math pattern appears to be very consistent!

You can download the time card at this link or view below.

Anna-May-Time-Card-April-9-2015 (4)

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3 replies »

  1. A private company would never allow payment for time not properly recorded. I need to record all my hours worked and specifically on what. No fudging is allowed. Further, the accuracy of my recordings have to align with both my physical check ins and check outs as recorded by a computer and my work-assigned computer usage time. Fudging is not only not paid, but it is grounds for expulsion from the company. Several people have been expelled for time fudging. All people caught fudging time have been expelled, and without the pay for which they fudged. An example is then made of them so other employees know they cannot get away with fudging time.

    The same should happen to Anna May Miller, only worse, since she has a duty to the public, and she has failed in that duty. She is effectively stealing from the public. That should be taken into consideration as well.

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